Internet Domains: The Unspeakable

(elkement. Created: 2015-12-05. Tags: Internet, Facepalm, Language, Web, Weird, Words. German Version.)

Global corporations have their brand names tested for potentially unwanted connotations in different cultures and languages. Now I understand why.

One minimum requirement is perhaps: Being able to get it across on the phone.

e-stangl.at

...That's my surname, in German it's pronounced like [Add phonetic cryptic signs here]. But never mind, I will spell it out...

radices.net

That's Latin and means Roots. It is a bit similar to radicles. Well, I realize now it differs just by a single letter... that may be unfortunate, sorry!

subversiv.at

All our domains have their issues, also in German. This is the only one that causes no troubles in German. But in English you need to stress:

It's the German translation of Subversive, just remove E at the end!

z-village.net

Wow - that works well in English! You just have to mention the dash!

epsi.name

It's just a non-sensical acronym, I'll spell it out... Yes, name really is a top-level domain!

Now we enter the realm of business - and we have obviously tested the domain with utmost diligence:

punktwissen.at

That's an artificial German word, Punkt actually meaning Point or Dot. Hadn't I mentioned that it might have been less confusing in English than it is in German. But I'll spell it out for you...

To make it more confusing in English, we could create better sub-domains and e-mail addresses - to convey the spirit of the German confusion:

  • point@point.punktwissen.at
  • point.dot@point.punktwissen.at
  • point.at.dot@point.punktwissen.at
  • point.at.dot@point.at.dot.punktwissen.at

I wonder if the US Department of Transportation has similar issues.

Personal website of Elke Stangl, Zagersdorf, Austria, c/o punktwissen.
elkement [at] subversiv [dot] at.